Gone are the days when employees had to use their hands and hand tools to perform essential tasks. With power tools, workers tend to produce better results with less effort in a shorter time. Still, such advanced tools can be dangerous. Even if you use power tools correctly, you may sustain a serious injury at work.

Records from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Consumer Product Safety Commission indicate that nearly a million people sustain some type of injury in a power tool accident in the United States every year. Fortunately, if you suffer an injury at work, you can likely receive workers’ compensation benefits. You may have other options, as well.

Common power tool injuries 

Power tools often have motors, blades, cords and other potentially hazardous components. Therefore, there are many different ways to injure yourself when using a power tool:

  • Amputations
  • Electrocution
  • Eye injuries
  • Burns
  • Lacerations

Because the body’s stress response includes a release of adrenaline, cortisol and other stress hormones, you may not immediately comprehend the severity of a power tool injury. Accordingly, you should always seek medical treatment for an injury involving a power tool.

Compensation for your injuries 

If you sustain an injury at work, workers’ compensation benefits are likely available to you. While these benefits provide payments for medical bills and lost wages, they do not cover your pain and suffering. You also waive your right to sue your employer. If the tool that caused your injury malfunctioned, though, you may also be able to bring a third-party lawsuit against its manufacturer or distributor. This type of action may give you the compensation you need to recover fully.

When working with power tools, you must take care not to suffer a serious injury. Unfortunately, though, power tool injuries occur at an alarming rate at job sites around the country. For that reason, you must act diligently to boost your odds of receiving reasonable compensation for your job-related injury.